Monday, 6 November 2017

John Cleese on Creativity

Much has been said about how creativity works, its secrets, its origins. In this fun and thought-provoking lecture, John Cleese offers a recipe for creativity, delivered with his usual blend of cultural insight and comedic genius. Specifically, Cleese outlines the 5 factors (listed below) that you can arrange to enhance creativity in your lives.




According to Cleese, creativity can only happen in open (-mind) mode, when you are free from interruptions, distractions, unlike when you're closed (-minded), which is when you are at 'work' busy with phone calls, stuff to do and there is some pressure, anxiety, and tension.

Open mode isn't all - there are 5 important elements required too:

1. SPACE - undisturbed, quiet, where there are no interruptions, phones ringing, emails being answered, etc, which means no TV!

2. TIME - a specific amount of time, at least 1.1/2 hours, which includes say 15-30 minutes for winding down and getting calm - again no TV!

3. TIME - yes more time, once you've created an oasis of calmness, you can tolerate the slight discomfort that you may feel until you solve the assignment/issue creatively and get some work done.

4. CONFIDENCE - so that there are no fears of making a mistake because nothing is wrong so there will be no mistakes. 

5. HUMOUR - this gets us from closed to open mode quicker - laughter helps us to relax and doesn't detract from the seriousness of the 'problem'. So laugh, giggle all you want when being creative.


Friday, 29 September 2017

Born Between the Lines - 4th Book Reading



The theme for my fourth and final book reading is leaving home—a reflective section—at the end of the Socialising chapter. At the age of 21, I had yet another decision to make that would mean returning to the place I had missed for eight years—London.

You can hear my reading taken from the chapter Socialising below:




Friday, 22 September 2017

Born Between the Lines: 3rd Book Reading


The theme for my third book reading is socialising. At the age of 18, I had a decision to make about who I would socialise with and how that would work in a mono-cultural small town called Wellingborough, in Northamptonshire. This reading is one of two. The second one will be posted next week. 

You can hear my reading taken from the chapter 'Socialising' below:




Friday, 15 September 2017

Born Between the Lines: 2nd Book Reading


The theme for my second book reading is work, which most of us have crossed paths with in one way or another. For me, trying to find work as a 16-year-old in Wellingborough, Northamptonshire, proved to be both revealing and challenging.  You can hear my reading on the subject of work below:





Friday, 8 September 2017

Born Between The Lines: Book Reading


Today I read 'Where are the black voices of rural and suburban Britain? We need to hear them', by Jesse Bernard online in the Guardian which prompted me to do a reading on Youtube from my autobiography: Born Between The Lines:



The article starts:

'If you're a member of a minority in a rural or suburban area of Britain, there's every likelihood that you will have been made aware of your race in school, in the local supermarket, by your neighbours and perhaps by the local authorities.'

This was certainly the case with my experience as a young mixed-race girl aged thirteen trying to find my way in a new school in Wellingborough, Northamptonshire in the 1960s.

The article ends by stating:

'It's  not about one experience — city or rural — being worse or better than the other. It's about amplifying a wide range of black British voices that exist not only in large, urban areas but also the farthest corners of the country. These are important stories, and if we continue to overlook them, it will damage any attempts to tackle how racism affects our society.'

You can read the whole article here.

If any of the above resonates with you, please do leave a comment. I know there are many unheard voices out there that need to be aired and shared.  I look forward to hearing from you.

Wednesday, 9 August 2017

Colonial Countryside: English Country Houses Reinterpreted


On 31st July, I joined the Centre for New Writing at University of Leicester as a Literary Associate as part of a new initiative to mobilise child historians to develop new audiences for cutting-edge research about British country houses' Caribbean and East India connections.

This is a child-led history and writing project led by Dr Corinne Fowler at the University of Leicester. The three-year collaborative project entitled, 'Colonial Countryside', will encourage primary pupils aged 10 to engage with country homes with the help of historians and writers. Peepal Tree Press will publish and resource new writing, stimulating widespread interest in this neglected aspect of British history.


You can listen to an interview with Dr Corinne Fowler on Leicester Radio below:



The Centre for New Writing team is kick-starting the initiative by crowdfunding a pilot event with Colmore Junior School in Birmingham, working with Kenwood and Harewood House.

The crowdfunding will pay for 20 children to visit country houses and related archives. It will also fund an historian and a writer, plus pay for a podcast narrated by the children, who will recount their experiences.


Dr Corinne Fowler, Director of the Centre for New Writing said, "Children make great researchers. They ask different sorts of questions to adults. This project will be led by children, who introduce parents, children, teachers, and country house visitors to a wide range of colonial connections. The aim is to encourage children to think of themselves as future leaders and historians in the field."


In the second phase, 100 primary pupils will visit 10 local country houses. They will explore the archives with an historian and work with a writer to produce pithy personal essays which will be communicated to live, print and digital audiences. Peepal Tree Press will also commission 10 high-profile writers to produce new creative work about each of the 10 participating houses. The books will be sold in the bookshops of those houses. The children will attend a conference with panels and keynotes but where only children speak. There will be a child-only advisory board and children will co-produce exhibitions, a massive online open course and they will participate in the training of heritage professionals.


Monday, 19 June 2017

Power of the Pen: Identities and Social Issues in Fiction and Nonfiction


The University of Iowa's International Writing Programme is running a free (yes free!) massive open online course (MOOC). Power of the Pen: Identities and Social Issues in Fiction and Nonfiction will focus on writing about identities, communities, and social issues in fiction and nonfiction.

This MOOC will:


  • Encourage you to write both fiction and nonfiction
  • Encourage you to explore the intersections between the two genres
  • Encourage you to explore the intersections of individual, community, and global identities
  • Encourage you to examine the effect of current social issues on individual, community, and global identities
  • Foreground the principles of short and long-term fiction
  • Foreground the principles of three forms of nonfiction: literary journalism, memoir essay, and personal essay
  • Support your experience of creative and cultural exchange with writers around the world!

Opened: May 15, 2017 - there is still plenty of time to participate.

All I can say is that each week the course continues to blow me away, not just with the quality of the well-established and award-winning writers that share their expertise in the weekly videos but with the excellence of the whole course in the way it has been so well constructed and delivered.

I encourage you to take a look and sign up!


Onward!